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Optimal motion and structure estimation

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3 Author(s)
Weng, Juyang ; Beckman Inst., Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL, USA ; Ahuja, N. ; Huang, T.S.

The causes of existing linear algorithms exhibiting various high sensitivities to noise are analyzed. It is shown that even a small pixel-level perturbation may override the epipolar information that is essential for the linear algorithms to distinguish different motions. This analysis indicates the need for optimal estimation in the presence of noise. Methods are introduced for optimal motion and structure estimation under two situations of noise distribution: known and unknown. Computationally, the optimal estimation amounts to minimizing a nonlinear function. For the correct convergence of this nonlinear minimization, a two-step approach is used. The first step is using a linear algorithm to give a preliminary estimate for the parameters. The second step is minimizing the optimal objective function starting from that preliminary estimate as an initial guess. A remarkable accuracy improvement has been achieved by this two-step approach over using the linear algorithm alone

Published in:

Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:15 ,  Issue: 9 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 1993

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