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Use Bit Scanning in Replacement Decisions

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2 Author(s)
Easton, Malcolm C. ; IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center ; Franaszek, Peter A.

In paged storage systems, page replacement policies generally depend on a use bit for each page frame. The use bit is automatically turned on when the resident page is referenced. Typically, a page is considered eligible for replacement if its use bit has been scanned and found to be off on µ consecutive occasions, where µ is a parameter of the algorithm. This investigation focuses on the dependence of the number of bit-scanning operations on the value of µ and on properties of the string of page references. The number of such operations is a measure of the system overhead incurred while making replacement decisions. In particular, for several algorithms, the number of scans per reference is shown to be approximately proportional to µ However, empirical results from single-program traces show that the value of µ has little effect on the miss ratio. Although the miss ratios for the bit-scanning algorithms are close to those of least recently used (LRU), it is pointed out that increasing the value of µ need not bring the bit-scanning policies closer to LRU management.

Published in:

Computers, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:C-28 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

Feb. 1979

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