Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Fault-Tolerant Computing: An Introduction and a Perspective

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Kime, C.R. ; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin

FAULT-TOLERANT computing has been defined as "the ability to execute specified algorithms correctly regardless of hardware failures, total system flaws, or program fallacies" [1]. To the extent that a system falls short of meeting the requirements of this definition, it can be labeled a partially fault-tolerant system [2]. Thus the definition of fault-tolerant computing provides a standard against which to measure all systems having a degree of fault tolerance. In particular, one can classify systems according to: 1), the amount of manual intervention required in performing three basic functions, and 2) the class of faults covered by three basic functions involved in fault tolerance: system validation, fault diagnosis, and fault masking or recovery. The word "fault" here is used to inclusively describe "failures, flaws, and fallacies" in the original definition. The first function is involved in the design and production of the system hardware and software, while the last two functions are embodied in the system itself. Likewise, the first function is directed to handling faults arising from design and production errors, whereas the last two functions are aimed at faults due to random hardware failures.

Published in:

Computers, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:C-24 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

May 1975

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.