Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Automated DNA fragments recognition and sizing through AFM image processing

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

4 Author(s)
Ficarra, E. ; Politecnico di Torino, Italy ; Benini, L. ; Macii, E. ; Zuccheri, Giampaolo

This paper presents an automated algorithm to determine DNA fragment size from atomic force microscope images and to extract the molecular profiles. The sizing of DNA fragments is a widely used procedure for investigating the physical properties of individual or protein-bound DNA molecules. Several atomic force microscope (AFM) real and computer-generated images were tested for different pixel and fragment sizes and for different background noises. The automated approach minimizes processing time with respect to manual and semi-automated DNA sizing. Moreover, the DNA molecule profile recognition can be used to perform further structural analysis. For computer-generated images, the root mean square error incurred by the automated algorithm in the length estimation is 0.6% for a 7.8 nm image pixel size and 0.34% for a 3.9 nm image pixel size. For AFM real images we obtain a distribution of lengths with a standard deviation of 2.3% of mean and a measured average length very close to the real one, with an error around 0.33%.

Published in:

Information Technology in Biomedicine, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:9 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

Dec. 2005

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.