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Independent field-oriented control of two split-phase induction motors from a single six-phase inverter

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5 Author(s)
Mohapatra, K.K. ; Electr. & Comput. Sci. Dept., Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA ; Kanchan, R.S. ; Baiju, M.R. ; Tekwani, P.N.
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Split-phase (six-phase) induction motor stator windings consist of two sets of three phase windings, which are spatially phase separated by 30 electrical degrees. Due to mutual cancellation of the air gap flux for all the 6n±1 (n=1,3,5...) order harmonic voltages, called zero sequence components, large harmonic currents are generated in the stator phases. Only the 12n±1 (n=0,1,2,3...)-order harmonic voltage components contribute toward the air gap flux and electromagnetic torque production in the machine. In this paper, a novel scheme is proposed where two six-phase induction motors are connected in series with proper phase sequence so that the zero sequence component voltages of one machine act as torque and flux producing components for the other. Thus, the two six-phase motors can be independently controlled from a single six-phase inverter. A vector control scheme for the dual motor drive is developed and experimentally verified in this paper.

Published in:

Industrial Electronics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:52 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Oct. 2005

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