Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

Identification of geometrical shapes in paintings and its application to demonstrate the foundations of geometry in 1650 B.C

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

9 Author(s)
Papaodysseus, C. ; Dept. of Electr. & Comput. Eng., Nat. Tech. Univ. of Athens, Greece ; Exarhos, M. ; Panagopoulos, T. ; Triantafillou, C.
more authors

In this paper, an original general methodology is introduced to establish whether a handmade shape corresponds to a given geometrical prototype. Using this methodology, one can decide if an artist had the intention of drawing a specific mathematical prototype or not. This analysis is applied to the 1650 B.C. wall paintings from the prehistoric settlement on Thera, and inferences of great archaeological and historical importance are made. In particular, strong evidence is obtained suggesting that the spirals depicted on the wall paintings correspond to linear (Archimedes) spirals, certain shapes correspond to canonical 48-gon and 32-gon, while other shapes correspond to parts of ellipses. It seems that the presented wall paintings constitute the earliest archaeological findings on which these geometrical patterns appear with such remarkable accuracy.

Published in:

Image Processing, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:14 ,  Issue: 7 )

Date of Publication:

July 2005

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.