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Linking Ontologies with Three-Dimensional Models of Anatomy to Predict the Effects of Penetrating Injuries

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5 Author(s)
Rubin, D.L. ; Stanford Medical Informatics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA ; Bashir, Y. ; Grossman, D. ; Dev, P.
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Rapid diagnosis of penetrating injuries is essential to increased chance of survival. Geometric models representing anatomic structures could be useful, but such models generally contain only information about the relationships of points in space as well as display properties. We describe an approach to predicting the anatomic consequences of penetrating injury by creating a geometric model of anatomy that integrates biomechanical and anatomic knowledge. We created a geometric model of the heart from the Visible Human image data set. We linked this geometric model of anatomy with an ontology of descriptive anatomic knowledge. A hierarchy of abstract geometric objects was created that represents organs and organ parts. These geometric objects contain information about organ identity, composition, adjacency, and tissue biomechanical properties. This integrated model can support anatomic reasoning. Given a bullet trajectory and a parametric representation of a cone of tissue damage, we can use our model to predict the organs and organ parts that are injured. Our model is extensible, being able to incorporate future information, such as physiological implications of organ injuries.

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2004. IEMBS '04. 26th Annual International Conference of the IEEE  (Volume:2 )

Date of Conference:

1-5 Sept. 2004

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