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A monolithic fully-differential CMOS gas sensor microsystem for microhotplate temperatures up to 450°C

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5 Author(s)
Barrettino, D. ; Phys. Electron. Lab., Swiss Fed. Inst. of Technol. Zurich, Switzerland ; Graf, M. ; Kirstein, K. ; Hierlemann, A.
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A fully-differential monolithic gas sensor microsystem fabricated in industrial CMOS-technology combined with post-CMOS micromachining is presented, which comprises a metal-oxide-covered (SnO2) microhotplate for operating temperatures up to 450°C by using a platinum (Pt) resistor as the microhotplate temperature sensor (polysilicon resistor in previous designs), a rail-to-rail differential difference amplifier (DDA) for analog proportional temperature control (room temperature-450°C±2°C), a logarithmic converter for measuring the SnO2-resistance change upon gas exposure over a range of four orders of magnitude, and a low-noise amplifier (LNA) for the readout of the platinum resistor. Temperature sensors, on- and off-membrane (near the circuitry), show excellent thermal isolation between the heated membrane area and the circuitry-area on the bulk chip (chip temperature rises by maximum 3°C at 450°C microhotplate temperature). Gas tests evidenced a detection limit below 1 ppm for carbon monoxide.

Published in:

Circuits and Systems, 2004. ISCAS '04. Proceedings of the 2004 International Symposium on  (Volume:4 )

Date of Conference:

23-26 May 2004