Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

The sampling-based neighborhood graph: an approach to computing and executing feedback motion strategies

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)
Libo Yang ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA, USA ; LaValle, S.M.

This paper presents a sampling-based approach to computing and executing feedback-motion strategies by defining a global navigation function over a collection of neighborhoods in configuration space. The collection of neighborhoods and their underlying connectivity structure are captured by a sampling-based neighborhood graph (SNG), on which navigation functions are built. The SNG construction algorithm incrementally places new neighborhoods in the configuration space, using distance information provided by existing collision-detection algorithms. A termination condition indicates the probability that a specified fraction of the space is covered. Our implementation illustrates the approach for rigid and articulated bodies with up to six-dimensional configuration spaces. Even over such spaces, rapid online responses to unpredictable configuration changes can be made in a few microseconds on standard PC hardware. Furthermore, if the goal is changed, an updated navigation function can be quickly computed without performing additional collision checking.

Published in:

Robotics and Automation, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:20 ,  Issue: 3 )

Date of Publication:

June 2004

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.