Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

A new high speed cmos camera for real-time tracking applications

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

4 Author(s)
Muehlmann, U. ; Graz University of Technology ; Ribo, M. ; Lang, P. ; Pinz, A.

There are many potential applications for very high-speed vision sensors in robotics. Maybe tracking is the most obvious one. The main idea of this paper is to combine existing standard technology (CMOS imaging sensors, FPGA "glue logic", and USB 2.0 interface) to use direct pixel access capabilities for real-time tracking. We designed and built such a prototype camera system, including FPGA programmed functionality for Fixed Pattern Noise (FPN) calibration, subsampling and direct subwindow access. The performance of this new camera is on one hand limited by the maximum pixel clock of the sensor, on the other hand by the USB 2.0 microframe timing and bandwith constraints. We achieve "frame rates" of up to 2.5 kHz for small subwindows which can be randomly and individually addressed for each update cycle. Besides all given technical details and specifications of the system, we show a demonstration application of a high-speed blob tracking system which verifies the usability of our new camera for highly demanding tracking applications.

Published in:

Robotics and Automation, 2004. Proceedings. ICRA '04. 2004 IEEE International Conference on  (Volume:5 )

Date of Conference:

April 26 2004-May 1 2004

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.