Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

A new simple ∞OH neuron model as a biologically plausible principal component analyzer

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Jankovic, M.V. ; Inst. of Electr. Eng. "Nikola Tesla", Belgrade, Serbia

A new approach to unsupervised learning in a single-layer neural network is discussed. An algorithm for unsupervised learning based upon the Hebbian learning rule is presented. A simple neuron model is analyzed. A dynamic neural model, which contains both feed-forward and feedback connections between the input and the output, has been adopted. The, proposed learning algorithm could be more correctly named self-supervised rather than unsupervised. The solution proposed here is a modified Hebbian rule, in which the modification of the synaptic strength is proportional not to pre- and postsynaptic activity, but instead to the presynaptic and averaged value of postsynaptic activity. It is shown that the model neuron tends to extract the principal component from a stationary input vector sequence. Usually accepted additional decaying terms for the stabilization of the original Hebbian rule are avoided. Implementation of the basic Hebbian scheme would not lead to unrealistic growth of the synaptic strengths, thanks to the adopted network structure.

Published in:

Neural Networks, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:14 ,  Issue: 4 )

Date of Publication:

July 2003

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.