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SQUID-based nondestructive evaluation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer

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4 Author(s)
Carr, C. ; Dept. of Phys. & Appl. Phys., Univ. of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK ; Graham, D. ; Macfarlane, J.C. ; Donaldson, G.B.

Recent work with HTS SQUIDs in nondestructive evaluation has concentrated on the detection of flaws in aircraft-grade aluminum, with particular emphasis on surface-breaking tears beside rivets. More complex materials are now also being used in aircraft manufacture, with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) being one of the most common. Existing technologies such as ultrasound are particularly well suited to the detection of impact-damaged sites and until now there have only been a few reports of eddy current examination of CFRP samples. Here we present results on samples with regions of heat damage, impact damage and with nonmagnetic inserts using eddy current detection techniques. We compare the signal to noise ratio and spatial resolution for a variety of sensors including HTS SQUIDs and gradiometers and conventional induction coils, and discuss variations in detection efficiency with field component measured.

Published in:

Applied Superconductivity, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:13 ,  Issue: 2 )

Date of Publication:

June 2003

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