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Estimating the photorealism of images: distinguishing paintings from photographs

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3 Author(s)
Cutzu, F. ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN, USA ; Hammoud, R. ; Leykin, A.

Automatic classification of an image as a photograph of a real-scene or as a painting is potentially useful for image retrieval and Web site filtering applications. The main contribution of the paper is the proposition of several features derived from the color, edge, and gray-scale-texture information of the image that effectively discriminate paintings from photographs. For example, we found that paintings contain significantly more pure-color edges, and that certain gray-scale-texture measurements (mean and variance of Gabor filters) are larger for photographs. Using a large set of images (12000) collected from different Web sites, the proposed features exhibit very promising classification performance (over 90%). A comparative analysis of the automatic classification results and psychophysical data is reported, suggesting that the proposed automatic classifier estimates the perceptual photorealism of a given picture.

Published in:

Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, 2003. Proceedings. 2003 IEEE Computer Society Conference on  (Volume:2 )

Date of Conference:

18-20 June 2003