Cart (Loading....) | Create Account
Close category search window
 

On decimal sequences (Corresp.)

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

2 Author(s)

The properties of decimal sequences of rational numbers are investigated with the idea of using them as random sequences and error-correcting codes, and in other applications in communications. Several structural properties of decimal sequences are presented with special attention being given to binary decimal sequences and reciprocals of primes. For a certain class of decimal sequences ofl/q, qprime, it is shown that the digits spaced half a period apart add up tor - 1, where r is the base in which the sequence is expressed. Also for the same class all subsequences of lengthm, wherer^{m} > q, are distinct. These underlying structural properties have made it possible to establish a lower bound on the Hamming distance between a given sequence and its cyclic shifts and also to obtain an upper bound on the autocorrelation function. A condition for the cross correlation of two decimal sequences being zero has also been obtained. The outcome of the calculations on decimal sequences of several primes is presented, and the results indicate that the autocorrelation function approximates that obtained for sequences of independent, equally likely random digits.

Published in:

Information Theory, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:27 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 1981

Need Help?


IEEE Advancing Technology for Humanity About IEEE Xplore | Contact | Help | Terms of Use | Nondiscrimination Policy | Site Map | Privacy & Opting Out of Cookies

A not-for-profit organization, IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology.
© Copyright 2014 IEEE - All rights reserved. Use of this web site signifies your agreement to the terms and conditions.