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Balancing buffer utilization in meshes using a "restricted area" concept

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3 Author(s)
Po-Jen Chuang ; Dept. of Electr. Eng., Tamkang Univ., Tamsui, Taiwan ; Juei-Tang Chen ; Yue-Tsuen Jiang

Adaptive routing and virtual channels are used to increase routing adaptivity in wormhole-routed two-dimensional meshes. But increasing channel buffer utilization without considering even distribution of the traffic loads tends to cause congestion in the most adaptive routing area. To avoid such traffic congestion, a concept of the restricted area is proposed. The proposed restricted area, defined to be a part of the network where message transmission concentrates, can be located following the region of adaptivity. By properly guiding message routing inside and outside the area, we are able to achieve more balanced buffer utilization and to reduce traffic congestion accordingly. The performance of several routing algorithms with or without using the restricted area is simulated and evaluated under various traffic loads and distribution patterns. The results indicate that routing algorithms with the restricted areas yield constantly larger throughput and smaller latency than routing algorithms without using the concept.

Published in:

Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:13 ,  Issue: 8 )

Date of Publication:

Aug 2002

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