By Topic

MR-guided vascular interventions

Sign In

Cookies must be enabled to login.After enabling cookies , please use refresh or reload or ctrl+f5 on the browser for the login options.

Formats Non-Member Member
$31 $13
Learn how you can qualify for the best price for this item!
Become an IEEE Member or Subscribe to
IEEE Xplore for exclusive pricing!
close button

puzzle piece

IEEE membership options for an individual and IEEE Xplore subscriptions for an organization offer the most affordable access to essential journal articles, conference papers, standards, eBooks, and eLearning courses.

Learn more about:

IEEE membership

IEEE Xplore subscriptions

1 Author(s)
Atalar, E. ; Departments of Radiol. & Biomed. Eng., Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD, USA

Summary form only given. In modern interventional procedures imaging plays a crucial role. This is especially true for vascular interventional procedures. With accurate determination of lesion position and size in the blood vessels as well as determination of related organ function, vascular interventions can be conducted quickly and accurately. X-ray fluoroscopy is the current standard for many procedures. Although the X-ray fluoroscopy technique is accurate for determining the position of interventional devices, the silhouette appearance of the organs and the invisibility of plaques limit many interventional. procedures. New magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that combine interventional abilities with versatile imaging capabilities have been developed. Currently, because of these new techniques, selective catheterizations of the coronary arteries can be achieved rapidly. Interventional MRI offers the best alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for vascular interventions with no risk of ionizing radiation for the patient and new imaging possibilities for the controlled delivery of future treatments.

Published in:

Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, 2001. Proceedings of the 23rd Annual International Conference of the IEEE  (Volume:4 )

Date of Conference:

2001