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An approach to analog mitigation of RFI

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4 Author(s)
Odling, P. ; Telecommun. Res. Center, Vienna, Austria ; Borjesson, P.O. ; Magesacher, T. ; Nordstrom, T.

Among all noise sources present in wireline transmission systems we focus on one special type: narrowband radio frequency interference generated by radio amateurs (RAM) and broadcast radio stations. This disturbance, characterized by high power and narrow bandwidth, has the potential of overloading the receiver's analog-to-digital converter (ADC). Once the ADC is in saturation, any countermeasure taken in digital domain will fail. A viable way to face this problem is cancellation using the common-mode signal as a reference. This paper describes in detail an adaptive, mixed-signal, narrowband interference canceller employing a modified recursive least-squares algorithm, which is split into an analog and a digital part. The mixed-signal approach enables the circuit to generate an interference-cancelling signal of several MHz while operating the adaptive algorithm at some kilohertz. Simulation as well as measurement results show a steady-state disturbance suppression of about 35 dB. The convergence speed is high enough to protect the ADC from overloading due to time-variant HAM interference

Published in:

Selected Areas in Communications, IEEE Journal on  (Volume:20 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Jun 2002

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