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Successive overrelaxation for support vector machines

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2 Author(s)
Mangasarian, O.L. ; Dept. of Comput. Sci., Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI, USA ; Musicant, D.R.

Successive overrelaxation (SOR) for symmetric linear complementarity problems and quadratic programs is used to train a support vector machine (SVM) for discriminating between the elements of two massive datasets, each with millions of points. Because SOR handles one point at a time, similar to Platt's sequential minimal optimization (SMO) algorithm (1999) which handles two constraints at a time and Joachims' SVMlight (1998) which handles a small number of points at a time, SOR can process very large datasets that need not reside in memory. The algorithm converges linearly to a solution. Encouraging numerical results are presented on datasets with up to 10 000 000 points. Such massive discrimination problems cannot be processed by conventional linear or quadratic programming methods, and to our knowledge have not been solved by other methods. On smaller problems, SOR was faster than SVMlight and comparable or faster than SMO

Published in:

Neural Networks, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:10 ,  Issue: 5 )

Date of Publication:

Sep 1999

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