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Performance analysis of a 3-2-1 pose estimation device

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4 Author(s)
Thomas, F. ; Ind. Robotics Inst., Spanish High Council for Sci. Res., Barcelona, Spain ; Ottaviano, E. ; Ros, L. ; Ceccarelli, M.

This paper deals with the problem of estimating the pose of a moving rigid body by measuring the length of six wires attached to it. Since wires can be seen as extensible legs, this problem is equivalent to that of solving the forward kinematics of a six-degree-of-freedom parallel manipulator. Among all possible locations for the attachments on the moving object, the "3-2-1" configuration is shown to exhibit a large number of favorable properties. The performance analysis of this particular configuration is addressed by finding analytic expressions for the estimated pose covariance matrix and the expected value of the pose estimation error, or bias error, which has been omitted in the previous analysis of wire-based tracking devices. This analysis takes advantage of a formulation for trilateration based on Cayley-Menger determinants, which is mathematically more tractable compared to previous ones, because all terms involved are determinants with geometric meaning. This accommodates a more thorough investigation of the properties of the device.

Published in:

Robotics, IEEE Transactions on  (Volume:21 ,  Issue: 3 )

Date of Publication:

June 2005

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