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    Mobile Robotics for Multidisciplinary Study

    Berry, C.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00407ED1V01Y201203CRM004
    Copyright Year: 2012

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    This lecture provides an introduction to the field of mobile robotics and the intersection between multiple robotics-related disciplines including electrical, mechanical, computer, software engineering and computer science. It is intended for an upper-level undergraduate or first-year graduate students interested in mobile robotics and artificial intelligence with some experience in object-oriented programming and controls. Focus areas will include robotics history, hardware, control and software. Specific topics include robot components, effectors and actuators, locomotion, kinematics, sensors, feedback control, control architectures, representation, navigation, localization and mapping. The end of each chapter includes review questions as well as exercises to provide applications for the concepts as well as opportunities for further study. Table of Contents: Introduction / Hardware / Control / Software View full abstract»

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    Control System Synthesis:A Factorization Approach, Part II

    Vidyasagar, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00358ED1V01Y201105CRM003
    Copyright Year: 2011

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    This book introduces the so-called "stable factorization approach" to the synthesis of feedback controllers for linear control systems. The key to this approach is to view the multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) plant for which one wishes to design a controller as a matrix over the fraction field F associated with a commutative ring with identity, denoted by R, which also has no divisors of zero. In this setting, the set of single-input, single-output (SISO) stable control systems is precisely the ring R, while the set of stable MIMO control systems is the set of matrices whose elements all belong to R. The set of unstable, meaning not necessarily stable, control systems is then taken to be the field of fractions F associated with R in the SISO case, and the set of matrices with elements in F in the MIMO case. The central notion introduced in the book is that, in most situations of practical interest, every matrix P whose elements belong to F can be "factored" as a "ratio" of two matrice N,D whose elements belong to R, in such a way that N,D are coprime. In the familiar case where the ring R corresponds to the set of bounded-input, bounded-output (BIBO)-stable rational transfer functions, coprimeness is equivalent to two functions not having any common zeros in the closed right half-plane including infinity. However, the notion of coprimeness extends readily to discrete-time systems, distributed-parameter systems in both the continuous- as well as discrete-time domains, and to multi-dimensional systems. Thus the stable factorization approach enables one to capture all these situations within a common framework. The key result in the stable factorization approach is the parametrization of all controllers that stabilize a given plant. It is shown that the set of all stabilizing controllers can be parametrized by a single parameter R, whose elements all belong to R. Moreover, every transfer matrix in the closed-loop system is an affine function of the design parameter R Thus problems of reliable stabilization, disturbance rejection, robust stabilization etc. can all be formulated in terms of choosing an appropriate R. This is a reprint of the book Control System Synthesis: A Factorization Approach originally published by M.I.T. Press in 1985. View full abstract»

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    SLAM--Simultaneous Localization and Mapping

    Christensen, Henrik
    Publication Year: 2007

    IEEE eLearning Library Courses

    This course covers the general area of Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM). Initially the problems of localization, mapping and SLAM are introduced from a methodological point of view. Different methods for representation of uncertainty will be introduced including their ability to handle single and multi-mode uncertainty representations. A number of example applications are discussed. View full abstract»

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    Essential Principles for Autonomous Robotics

    Hexmoor, H.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00506ED1V01Y201305AIM021
    Copyright Year: 2013

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    From driving, flying, and swimming, to digging for unknown objects in space exploration, autonomous robots take on varied shapes and sizes. In part, autonomous robots are designed to perform tasks that are too dirty, dull, or dangerous for humans. With nontrivial autonomy and volition, they may soon claim their own place in human society. These robots will be our allies as we strive for understanding our natural and man-made environments and build positive synergies around us. Although we may never perfect replication of biological capabilities in robots, we must harness the inevitable emergence of robots that synchronizes with our own capacities to live, learn, and grow. This book is a snapshot of motivations and methodologies for our collective attempts to transform our lives and enable us to cohabit with robots that work with and for us. It reviews and guides the reader to seminal and continual developments that are the foundations for successful paradigms. It attempts to demystify the abilities and limitations of robots. It is a progress report on the continuing work that will fuel future endeavors. Table of Contents: Part I: Preliminaries/Agency, Motion, and Anatomy/Behaviors / Architectures / Affect/Sensors / Manipulators/Part II: Mobility/Potential Fields/Roadmaps / Reactive Navigation / Multi-Robot Mapping: Brick and Mortar Strategy / Part III: State of the Art / Multi-Robotics Phenomena / Human-Robot Interaction / Fuzzy Control / Decision Theory and Game Theory / Part IV: On the Horizon / Applications: Macro and Micro Robots / References / Author Biography / Discussion View full abstract»

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    The Reaction Wheel Pendulum

    Block, D. ; Astrom, K. ; Spong, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00085ED1V01Y200702CRM001
    Copyright Year: 2007

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    This monograph describes the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, the newest inverted-pendulum-like device for control education and research. We discuss the history and background of the reaction wheel pendulum and other similar experimental devices. We develop mathematical models of the reaction wheel pendulum in depth, including linear and nonlinear models, and models of the sensors and actuators that are used for feedback control. We treat various aspects of the control problem, from linear control of themotor, to stabilization of the pendulum about an equilibrium configuration using linear control, to the nonlinear control problem of swingup control. We also discuss hybrid and switching control, which is useful for switching between the swingup and balance controllers. We also discuss important practical issues such as friction modeling and friction compensation, quantization of sensor signals, and saturation. This monograph can be used as a supplement for courses in feedback control at the ndergraduate level, courses in mechatronics, or courses in linear and nonlinear state space control at the graduate level. It can also be used as a laboratory manual and as a reference for research in nonlinear control. View full abstract»

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    Control System Synthesis:A Factorization Approach

    Vidyasagar, M.
    DOI: 10.2200/S00351ED1V01Y201105CRM002
    Copyright Year: 2011

    Morgan and Claypool eBooks

    This book introduces the so-called "stable factorization approach" to the synthesis of feedback controllers for linear control systems. The key to this approach is to view the multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) plant for which one wishes to design a controller as a matrix over the fraction field F associated with a commutative ring with identity, denoted by R, which also has no divisors of zero. In this setting, the set of single-input, single-output (SISO) stable control systems is precisely the ring R, while the set of stable MIMO control systems is the set of matrices whose elements all belong to R. The set of unstable, meaning not necessarily stable, control systems is then taken to be the field of fractions F associated with R in the SISO case, and the set of matrices with elements in F in the MIMO case. The central notion introduced in the book is that, in most situations of practical interest, every matrix P whose elements belong to F can be "factored" as a "ratio" of two matrice N,D whose elements belong to R, in such a way that N,D are coprime. In the familiar case where the ring R corresponds to the set of bounded-input, bounded-output (BIBO)-stable rational transfer functions, coprimeness is equivalent to two functions not having any common zeros in the closed right half-plane including infinity. However, the notion of coprimeness extends readily to discrete-time systems, distributed-parameter systems in both the continuous- as well as discrete-time domains, and to multi-dimensional systems. Thus the stable factorization approach enables one to capture all these situations within a common framework. The key result in the stable factorization approach is the parametrization of all controllers that stabilize a given plant. It is shown that the set of all stabilizing controllers can be parametrized by a single parameter R, whose elements all belong to R. Moreover, every transfer matrix in the closed-loop system is an affine function of the design parameter R Thus problems of reliable stabilization, disturbance rejection, robust stabilization etc. can all be formulated in terms of choosing an appropriate R. This is a reprint of the book Control System Synthesis: A Factorization Approach originally published by M.I.T. Press in 1985. View full abstract»

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