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    Work in progress: Integration of topic modules and organization of session flow for the First-Year Seminar course in engineering to motivate and sustain student learning

    Sundaram, R.
    Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2011.6142696
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): F3D-1 - F3D-2
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper presents the overview of course instructional material in modules and the organization of these modules for presentation in sessions of the critical entry-level course, First-Year Seminar in Engineering, for undergraduate engineering majors at ABET-accredited institutions of higher education. The First-Year Seminar in Engineering at our University is offered once each year during the fall term. The enrollment can be between 45 and 50 first-year students. In recent years, the course, which is coordinated by one engineering faculty member and taught by up to fifteen different instructors, comprises a loosely organized collection of engineering and non-engineering topics delivered in twenty eight 55-minute sessions of the semester (14 weeks of instruction). The summative assessment of the student learning outcomes has revealed glaring weaknesses in content and delivery. For the incoming engineering student to receive both the holistic university experience and the ability to learn and retain fundamental engineering principles and practices, the course is being revised through central and integrative engineering design projects with service learning components. The revised structure places emphasis on the continuity across modules and sessions to ensure (a) the sustained engagement, and (b) the highest levels of student learning and retention of concepts throughout the semester. View full abstract»

  • Freely Available from IEEE

    SSCS-Italy Seminar on “Topics on Microelectronics” in May [Chapters]

    Baschirotto, A. ; Olstein, K.
    Solid-State Circuits Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 3 , Issue: 3
    DOI: 10.1109/MSSC.2011.941970
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 40

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

  • Freely Available from IEEE

    6th Annual ??Topics on Microelectronics?? Seminar Held by SSCS-Italy: Programs in January and May at the University of Pavia [Chapters]

    Baschirotto, A.
    Solid-State Circuits Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 4 , Issue: 3
    DOI: 10.1109/MSSC.2012.2202510
    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 88 - 89

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

  • Freely Available from IEEE

    SSCS-Italy Presents Seminar in January on “Topics on Microelectronics” [Chapters]

    Baschirotto, A. ; Olstein, K.
    Solid-State Circuits Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 3 , Issue: 2
    DOI: 10.1109/MSSC.2011.940920
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 77

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

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    Senior design projects with industry

    Bergman, C.A.
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 1998. FIE '98. 28th Annual

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.1998.736894
    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 466 - 469 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (3)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    For more than seven years the Binghamton University Electrical Engineering Department has had a capstone 1-semester design course, in cooperation with local industry, in its core curriculum. Projects are requested from local companies; students select their teams and projects and the teams meet with their company and faculty advisors every week. Two design reviews, held on company premises and attended by several company engineers, are held for each project. Final presentations and final reports complete the projects. The course has evolved from a multi-instructor fragmented course with low success rates, to a single-instructor course with a 70% success rate in terms of delivering working prototypes. This paper describes the original goals and structure of the course and how it has evolved over the years as specific problem areas were addressed and overcome, leading to the current course goals and structure. Also, assessment techniques are described, along with a list of projects and seminar topics from spring, 1998. ABET 2000 will require course changes. The planned modifications are described, as well as the rationale and plan to take this course from a one-semester, two-credit course to a two-semester, eight-credit course. View full abstract»

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    Community learning component in first year seminar

    Lin Cheng
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 2013 IEEE

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2013.6684842
    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 334 - 336

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This Work in Progress paper describes current efforts to engage Liberal Art College freshman to the Engineering discipline and its impact to the broader community, through a topic-based, writing-intensive seminar course. In this particular seminar developed by the author, we aim to discuss the role of engineers in tackling challenges in the Community around the Hartford area and beyond. While students enrolled in the seminar course in this paper are mainly “undecided” students, we believe by emphasizing technologies applied to the immediate community around our students and humanitarian applications, we can inspire students' interest in Engineering and show students how the skills they will be learning can have a positive impact on the quality of life for the surrounding community. The seminar was assessed by gathering student comments concerning each major course components. View full abstract»

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    Improving classroom teaching in higher education environment using web-based formative assessment

    Gamulin, J. ; Gugić, J. ; Gamulin, O.
    MIPRO, 2010 Proceedings of the 33rd International Convention

    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 1001 - 1006
    Cited by:  Papers (3)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    In order to improve student-centered approach to assessment and learning a web application named Pitalica has been developed. The application allows the teacher to question students during the seminar and to detect through their answers the level of their former knowledge and the level of understanding and ability to follow the seminar topics. The development of application is also the attempt to motivate the students to participate during and to prepare before seminars. The paper will discuss this project of formative assessment using computers and the Internet and the possibility to improve the teaching process. The web application Pitalica has been used during Physics course among first year medical students. A survey questioning self perceived interaction with the teacher, motivation, self assessment of general competencies acquired, satisfaction, ICT literacy and some general guidance for the improvement of the web application itself was conducted on a sample of 122 respondents in 2008 and on the sample of 153 respondents in 2009. The simple descriptive statistics has been applied and afterwards the Principle Component Analysis. Teachers involved were interviewed in order to collect their impressions. The results showed general positive students' and teachers' attitude towards the use of the web application Pitalica. View full abstract»

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    Relative effectiveness of different first-year engineering seminars

    Montgomery, R. ; Follman, D. ; Diefes-Dux, H.
    Frontiers in Education, 2003. FIE 2003 33rd Annual

    Volume: 2
    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2003.1264762
    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): F4D - 7-12 Vol.2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The importance of first-year small group seminars in student retention has been well-documented by many researchers. The offerings of Purdue's Department of Freshman Engineering have varied over the years, with instructors continually striving to improve the format and content of the first-year seminar courses. A recent change to one of these seminars has prompted a preliminary evaluation of seminar effectiveness. Three seminars were investigated: ENGR 104, ENGR 103, and ENGR 100. ENGR 104, Introduction to Engineering and Purdue, is led by peer mentors and provides "survival skills" and insight into being an engineering student from the perspective of upper-division engineering students. ENGR 103, Introduction to Careers in Engineering, covers current engineering issues and/or research topics in addition to college "survival skills". ENGR 100, Freshman Engineering Lectures, is a large seminar introduction to the engineering disciplines that is required for all first-year engineering students. It can be taken alone or imbedded in ENGR 103 and ENGR 104. Engineering faculty leads both ENGR 103 and ENGR 100 from Purdue's schools of engineering. The primary objective of this research is to evaluate the ways the different seminar types (instructor-led versus student-led and small-group versus large lecture) may affect such outcomes as student satisfaction, confidence in major choice, academic performance, and retention in engineering. In this paper, differences in student retention, interest in and understanding of engineering disciplines and careers, and satisfaction with the seminar offering taken among students in the three different seminars is evaluated. Furthermore, the extent to which students are sure about their choice of major, to which the seminar contributed to this decision, and to which the seminar aided their academic and personal transition to college is discussed. View full abstract»

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    A Practical Approach to Align Research with Master's Level Courses

    Kuhrmann, M.
    Computational Science and Engineering (CSE), 2012 IEEE 15th International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/ICCSE.2012.35
    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 202 - 208
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Software Engineering is a discipline in computer sciences that covers different topics ranging from formal methods to practical topics. An essential part of Software Engineering is the organization and the management of software projects. From several studies we know that we master the "craftsmanship", which means coding, but suffer in the organizational topics, i.e. project or process management. Those topics are important to Software Engineering, however, they are rather boring for students, which makes it hard to enthuse them about such topics. During the last years we developed a teaching format that on the one hand covers those high-level and abstract topics and, on the other hand, provides students with the opportunity to have experiences, and lecturers to conduct research. In this paper we present a concept for courses that combines the classic teaching formats lecture, seminar and practical training into a new format that allows for interactive teaching as well as for conducting research. We contribute a blueprint, which can be implemented in further courses. We present experiences made in a first implementation in the area of software process management, and conclude the paper with a discussion and a teaching agenda. View full abstract»

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    Integrating engineering into a freshman liberal arts curriculum

    Bolding, K. ; Bauman, E.
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 1999. FIE '99. 29th Annual

    Volume: 3
    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.1999.840419
    Publication Year: 1999 , Page(s): 13C2/1 - 13C2/5 vol.3

    IEEE Conference Publications

    As more universities move towards a common "core" curriculum for freshmen, engineering often is pushed to the side in favor of more traditional liberal arts and science courses. We describe the integration of engineering into Seattle Pacific University's new core curriculum. A crucial part is the freshman University Seminar. It is meant to introduce the student to a liberal arts education by studying one particular subject in an introductory manner while covering basic freshman topics such as writing, public speaking and computer literacy. We designed and taught a section of University Seminar entitled "Engineering and Technology: Shaping the Matter and Mind of Society" that focuses on studying the contributions of innovators to society as well as learning what influence society has on the innovators' successes and failures. This was accompanied by several learning exercises including a project in which teams build robots from kits and modify them. The class ends with a race of all the students' robots. By teaching this class we were able to: allow freshmen to experience the basics of engineering; develop relationships with first-quarter freshman engineers; integrate engineering into the core of a "liberal arts" curriculum; and enhance the ties between engineering faculty and those in other fields. We report on the history of the relationship between engineering and the liberal arts at SPU, the formation of the engineering University Seminar and its content, and the lasting effects of teaching this seminar. View full abstract»

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    Bridging the educational gap in embedded systems curricula: developing an e-commerce audio streaming system

    Leeman, M. ; Barat, F. ; De Florio, V. ; Deconinck, G.
    Engineering of Computer-Based Systems, 2002. Proceedings. Ninth Annual IEEE International Conference and Workshop on the

    DOI: 10.1109/ECBS.2002.999840
    Publication Year: 2002 , Page(s): 211 - 220

    IEEE Conference Publications

    In this paper, a design seminar on embedded systems is described for fourth year students in the multimedia and signal processing option at our electrical engineering department. The aim of the seminar is to ease up the adaptation of the universitary curriculum to what is expected by industry of a high level engineer. The main purpose of the seminar is to provide the students with a real life problem, covering different expertise areas and multiple hardware platforms, programming techniques and development tools in order to develop a commercially viable application with off-the-shelf tools, hardware and software. The interdisciplinary character of this seminar is an excellent opportunity to see how the different topics taught in different courses interact in a real life system View full abstract»

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    Development and Assessment of an Undergraduate Curriculum for First-Year International Engineering Students

    Cox, M.F. ; Diefes-Dux, H. ; Julim Lee
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 36th Annual

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2006.322558
    Publication Year: 2006 , Page(s): 15 - 18

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Each year, the first-year programs team of an engineering student organization at a midwest university collaborates with engineering faculty to develop a first-year seminar that introduces students to college life and to engineering. The seminar is instructed by upper-division peer mentors who develop course lesson plans and learning objectives and mentor first-year engineering students. Over time, the number of divisions devoted primarily to international student instruction has increased from one to three divisions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which first-year international students perceive the seminar as beneficial to their college transition. Overall, international students more positively rated topics that were congruent with their interests and experiences. This paper is significant in that it assesses international students' perceptions of the course curriculum, describes revisions to the international student division curriculum, and details the overall benefits of international-to-international student peer mentoring within first-year engineering programs View full abstract»

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    Industry Involvement in Undergraduate Research Project for Chemical Engineering (Biotechnology) Programme

    Zainol, N. ; Abidin, S.Z. ; Yazid, N.A.
    Teaching and Learning in Computing and Engineering (LaTiCE), 2014 International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/LaTiCE.2014.45
    Publication Year: 2014 , Page(s): 196 - 200

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper reported on industry involvement in Undergraduate Research Project (URP) course. During the final year of study, Chemical Engineering (Biotechnology) (BKB) students were required to conduct a final year project. Undergraduate Research Project (URP) was divided into two which were URP I and URP II. In URP I, students have to prepare a research proposal and URP II was the continuation of URP I. In URP II the students were required to conduct the research and produce the dissertation. Rubrics for each evaluation have been developed to clearly define the assessments. In order to ensure a strong connection between students, staff and industry, BKB students were required to have at least 15% industrially linked/based URP topics. Starting from 2012, the faculty has invited external examiners from research institution and industries to assess students during their URP II presentation seminar. The presentation seminar was successfully conducted with the involvement of 14 industrial academic panels. The panels came from various industries, research institutes and consultation companies such as Petronas, MTBE Malaysia, Bio tropics Malaysia, MOX Gases, FRIM and Sime Darby. Their recommendations and suggestions during the presentation projects have benefited all students and lecturer towards improving their research works. Other than that, the requirement to have at least 15% industrially linked URP topics has strengthened the relationship between the faculty and industry. In addition, several URP projects has been sent for research exhibition, internal and externally. View full abstract»

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    Information design: A curriculum for the 21st century

    McKim, J.C. ; Derksen, G. ; Patwardhan, H. ; Peters, C. ; Sarow, M.
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 2008. FIE 2008. 38th Annual

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2008.4720358
    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): T3E-7 - T3E-12

    IEEE Conference Publications

    In Fall, 2007, Winthrop University began accepting students to a new degree program entitled information design. This is an intensely interdisciplinary program spanning four departments and three colleges. The four departments are computer science and marketing from the college of business, design from the college of visual and performing arts and mass communication from the college of arts and sciences. The program consists of four specialties and a set of core courses and seminars. The specialties are: Web application design, offered by computer science; interactive media, offered by design; digital commerce, offered by marketing; and digital mass media, offered by mass communications. Each student takes all the core courses and seminars, and selects a specialty. The core courses consist of one or two introductory courses from each specialty. In addition, a freshman seminar helps students understand the different specialties, a later seminar introduces cutting edge topics in the field, and a senior seminar requires synthesis across the disciplines. In the latter students will work in teams to solve a problem for a local company or nonprofit. The ideal team will be four students, one from each specialty. The core courses are highly integrated, with each (except the first, of course) requiring one or more of the others as prerequisites or corequisites. There is also substantial overlap among the specialties. We expect assessment criteria will ensure that this degree of integration is maintained over time. This paper includes a detailed description of the program, a summary of its origins (largely industry driven) and a description of the assessment criteria. View full abstract»

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    A cornerstone course for Freshman computer science students

    Prins, P.R. ; Burris, C.H., Jr.
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 1998. FIE '98. 28th Annual

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.1998.736890
    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 447 - 449 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (2)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    "Why are we studying this?" "What area of Computer Science should I concentrate on?" "Are the really good Computer Scientists all hackers and nerds?" To answer questions like these and to attract young people seeking a career that will benefit society, we describe and make a case for, a Freshman seminar course for the Computer Science (CS) major. Just as the Senior seminar is called a capstone course indicating a capping of a student's college experience, we call this Freshman seminar a cornerstone course indicating a solid foundation to build on. The purpose of the course is to provide an overview of CS. This overview forms a framework for students as they go on to study their major courses allowing them to know where they are in the landscape of CS keeping the "big picture" in mind. Students taking this course are more informed and can steer their way through the maze of elective courses in a more deliberate manner. It also serves as an aid in student advising and begins a process directed from the beginning toward a career goal, giving their education focus and purpose. Our course is meant to complement a Senior capstone course; topics studied in this course are reinforced in the capstone course. Ideally, this course will satisfy a general education requirement so there is no encumbrance to the major (only contribution!) and ours is written so it does just that. We cannot require our majors to take this course, only recommend that they fulfil part of their GE requirements by taking it. View full abstract»

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    Presenting the successful technical seminar

    Ealey, Thomas
    Professional Communication, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: PC-26 , Issue: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/TPC.1983.6448660
    Publication Year: 1983 , Page(s): 35 - 37

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    Conducting a successful technical seminar requires careful preparation. Pre-seminar planning includes (1) outlining your material, (2) developing much more material than you think you'll need, and (3) arranging comfortable and appropriate facilities. At the beginning of the seminar you should provide a topical outline and announce plans to take a break between topics or at least hourly. After the presentation, time should be allowed not only for questions and answers but also for an evaluation to help you prepare for future seminars. View full abstract»

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    LPTA: A Probabilistic Model for Latent Periodic Topic Analysis

    Zhijun Yin ; Liangliang Cao ; Jiawei Han ; Cheng Xiang Zhai ; Huang, T.
    Data Mining (ICDM), 2011 IEEE 11th International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/ICDM.2011.96
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 904 - 913
    Cited by:  Papers (3)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper studies the problem of latent periodic topic analysis from time stamped documents. The examples of time stamped documents include news articles, sales records, financial reports, TV programs, and more recently, posts from social media websites such as Flickr, Twitter, and Face book. Different from detecting periodic patterns in traditional time series database, we discover the topics of coherent semantics and periodic characteristics where a topic is represented by a distribution of words. We propose a model called LPTA (Latent Periodic Topic Analysis) that exploits the periodicity of the terms as well as term co-occurrences. To show the effectiveness of our model, we collect several representative datasets including Seminar, DBLP and Flickr. The results show that our model can discover the latent periodic topics effectively and leverage the information from both text and time well. View full abstract»

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    Sloan Foundation Initiatives at Purdue University: longitudinal results [engineering education]

    Wadsworth, E.M.
    Frontiers in Education Conference, 1997. 27th Annual Conference. Teaching and Learning in an Era of Change. Proceedings.

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.1997.644827
    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 144 - 148 vol.1

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper documents longitudinal results of nine Sloan Foundation Initiatives involving 6981 people that were offered at Purdue University from 1991 through 1996 under a grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Recruitment initiatives included a videotape effort and personal connection program. Retention efforts involved a peer group project, two undergraduate mentoring programs; one graduate mentoring program and a leadership program. Two additional activities were a graduate seminar series and a classroom climate workshop program. Findings from the graduate school seminar series for 1995 and 1996 showed that knowledge of program topics, on the part of students, expanded after attending sessions. Two years of results in 1995 and 1996 for the classroom climate workshop program indicated that: female engineering and science graduate teaching assistants had a more accurate awareness of gender equity issues than their male counterparts; interactive theatre was an effective medium for gender equity workshops; and treating all students fairly was an important action step that was implemented by participants and had a positive impact on their college classroom climates View full abstract»

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    Work in progress — Developing an individualized life-long learning plan for junior electrical and Computer Engineering majors

    Elmore, M. ; Constable, J.
    Frontiers in Education Conference (FIE), 2011

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2011.6142723
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): T3C-1 - T3C-3

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), now ABET Inc., adopted Engineering Criteria 2000 (EC2000) in 1997. At the time this was considered a revolutionary approach to accreditation criteria, because of its focus on what is learned in the classroom rather than what is taught. In the spring of 2003 the faculty of the Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering department at Binghamton University approved a new course - EECE 382 - Electrical and Computer Engineering Seminar II. The intent was to consolidate topics that were being taught across several courses within one focused seminar to better ensure that Criteria 3 of General Criteria for Basic Level Programs - Program Outcomes and Objectives - was consistently addressed. EECE 382 was to provide an overview of the professional aspects of the fields of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. This paper reports on how one of the objectives of Criteria 3: `a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning' is addressed in EECE 382. View full abstract»

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    Research challenges in intervehicular communication: lessons of the 2010 Dagstuhl Seminar

    Dressler, F. ; Kargl, F. ; Ott, J. ; Tonguz, O.K. ; Wischhof, L.
    Communications Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 49 , Issue: 5
    DOI: 10.1109/MCOM.2011.5762813
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 158 - 164
    Cited by:  Papers (11)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    Intervehicle communication has become an extremely hot topic in networking research, opening up new research challenges well beyond those of classical mobile ad hoc network research. In October 2010, a Dagstuhl seminar has been organized bringing together many of the internationally leading experts in this field to discuss open issues and challenges related to IVC. This article reports the main findings of this meeting, that was set up to cover a wide range of topics. In particular, the following four areas were studied in working groups: Fundamental Limits and Opportunities of IVC, IVC Communication Principles and Patterns, Security and Privacy in IVC, and IVC Simulation and Modeling. A general conclusion drawn is that IVC is now at a turning point where the firstgeneration systems are engineered and will soon be brought to the market, while at the same time, IVC is experiencing the beginning of a new era characterized by a more fundamental research approach. View full abstract»

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    Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing Newsletter, IEEE

    Volume: 55 , Issue: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/MSP.1981.237253
    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 2

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

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    Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing Newsletter, IEEE

    Volume: 56 , Issue: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/MSP.1981.237280
    Publication Year: 1981 , Page(s): 2

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    Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Processing Newsletter, IEEE

    Volume: 60 , Issue: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/MSP.1982.237701
    Publication Year: 1982 , Page(s): 2

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

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    Work in progress - development of an engineering technology freshman seminar course

    Kinsler, L. ; Leite, P. ; Williamson, M.
    Frontiers In Education Conference - Global Engineering: Knowledge Without Borders, Opportunities Without Passports, 2007. FIE '07. 37th Annual

    DOI: 10.1109/FIE.2007.4417899
    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): S1J-5 - S1J-6

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Current research has shown that the freshman year can be crucial for the success or failure of students. The first-year experience for undergraduate students has been a topic of concern in our college for some time now - especially when it relates to student success, satisfaction, and retention. Like most institutions of higher education, our students come from diverse backgrounds, different levels of academic preparation, age levels, and socio-economic backgrounds. Some are not even sure if they are in the right place to start with. These factors can make the transition to post-secondary education very difficult for most students, especially the freshman class. This paper discusses the evolution of a Freshman Seminar course from inception to its current configuration. Topics include the events and forces driving the format and topic changes of the course, outcome expectations by faculty, students' course evaluation, and plans for expected changes. View full abstract»

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    Big data integration

    Dong, X.L. ; Srivastava, D.
    Data Engineering (ICDE), 2013 IEEE 29th International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/ICDE.2013.6544914
    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 1245 - 1248
    Cited by:  Papers (2)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The Big Data era is upon us: data is being generated, collected and analyzed at an unprecedented scale, and data-driven decision making is sweeping through all aspects of society. Since the value of data explodes when it can be linked and fused with other data, addressing the big data integration (BDI) challenge is critical to realizing the promise of Big Data. BDI differs from traditional data integration in many dimensions: (i) the number of data sources, even for a single domain, has grown to be in the tens of thousands, (ii) many of the data sources are very dynamic, as a huge amount of newly collected data are continuously made available, (iii) the data sources are extremely heterogeneous in their structure, with considerable variety even for substantially similar entities, and (iv) the data sources are of widely differing qualities, with significant differences in the coverage, accuracy and timeliness of data provided. This seminar explores the progress that has been made by the data integration community on the topics of schema mapping, record linkage and data fusion in addressing these novel challenges faced by big data integration, and identifies a range of open problems for the community. View full abstract»

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