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    Power Electronic Devices in Modern Power Systems

    Biczel, P. ; Jasinski, A. ; Lachecki, J.
    EUROCON, 2007. The International Conference on "Computer as a Tool"

    DOI: 10.1109/EURCON.2007.4400220
    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1586

    IEEE Conference Publications

    There are two main trends in present development of power systems. First is a wide utilization of renewable power resources. The second is decentralization of power generation. Hence, small power sources, very often RES sources, called dissipated power generators are developed. They are usually in range of megawatts starting form kilowatts. They operate automatically and are remotely controlled. In fact the sources are electronic devices. Microprocessor control units are used to control power production and perform remote control and power electronic converters are used to control power flow. So, many different kinds of power electronic devices are required. Another political and social trend is local balancing of power production and power consumption. It means that all power consumed in some are should be generated in the area. Hence small power systems are developed called microgrids. Microgrids consist of power sources, loads, control units and lines, like normal public grid. But the microgrid is limited to the small area, i.e. village, town, and automatically controlled. Again power electronic devices and control units decide about the microgrid performances. Development of required devices, both power electronic and controllers, are possible only with close cooperation of research units, like Warsaw University of Technology, and production firms, like APS Energia. APS Energia offers many power electronic converters and complete power plant and control and supervisory remote controllers for power industry. Some are especially developed for dissipated generation. The University's researchers design some devices and their principles of operation. APS Energia produces the devices. The main, presented in the paper are inverter with MPP tracking for PV systems, inverters for supplying AC loads from DC power systems, PEM fuel cell power generation units, battery chargers, high power inverters and rectifiers with sinusoidal input current, synchronization systems and - remote control and monitoring devices. There are some examples of applications in the paper. View full abstract»

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    Active Power Management of Electric Power System Using Emerging Power Electronics Technology

    Huang, A.Q. ; Bhattacharya, S. ; Baran, M. ; Bin Chen ; Chong Han
    Power Engineering Society General Meeting, 2007. IEEE

    DOI: 10.1109/PES.2007.386146
    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 1 - 7
    Cited by:  Papers (7)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Operation of today's very large scale and interconnected electric power systems depends critically on the devices that facilitate management of power flow on the grid. These devices can be based on passive components such as capacitor and inductor, or rely on the solid state power electronics technology to achieve much faster control bandwidth. Widely known as FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission system) devices, these power electronics controllers can regulate voltage and improve stability, hence increasing power flow capability, or they can be used to directly control the power flow, or they can be used to separate regional grid from each other to reduce the interactions between these grids. More advanced applications include the incorporation of energy storage to shape the peak power requirement and to smooth the power output of large wind farms. While the benefit of an actively managed power grid is well understood, widespread use of power electronics controllers in electric power grid is still limited. The main reason behind this is the higher cost and perceived lower reliability. In this paper, the authors will discuss emerging power electronics controllers that are under development at Semiconductor Power Electronics Center of NC State University, and explain how these developments will facilitate wider and broader applications. View full abstract»

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    The state-of-the-art power electronics technologies and future trends

    Lee, F.C.
    Power Engineering Society Summer Meeting, 2000. IEEE

    Volume: 2
    DOI: 10.1109/PESS.2000.867556
    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 1229 - 1232 vol. 2
    Cited by:  Papers (2)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Power electronics and related power processing technologies constitute an “enabling infrastructure technology” with a significant potential impact on US industrial competitiveness. This is manifested through the increased energy efficiency of equipment and processes using electrical power, and through higher industrial productivity and higher product quality, which results from the ability to control precisely the electrical power for manufacturing operations. Sales of power electronics equipment exceed $60 billion each year, and affect another $1 trillion in hardware electronics sales. Improvements in the technology of such a dynamic market is an exciting endeavor. Industrial firms are under constant pressure to produce power electronics products that are more powerful dependable and durable, smaller in size, lighter in weight, and less costly to the consumer. Power electronics products, to date, are essentially custom-designed, with a long design cycle time. The equipment is designed and manufactured largely using nonstandard parts. Thus, manufacturing processes are labor-intensive, resulting in high cost and poor reliability. Consequently, the US is losing its manufacturing base to global competitors, especially in those regions where labor costs are significantly lower than those of the US. This paper discusses the limitations in power semiconductor devices, passive components, power electronics packaging, power electronics modules, motor drives, and new generation computer/telecommunication equipment. The technology advancements needed are then discussed View full abstract»

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    Power electronics quo vadis?

    van Wyk, J.D.
    Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference (EPE/PEMC), 2012 15th International

    DOI: 10.1109/EPEPEMC.2012.6397377
    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): Session 1-1 - Session 1-9

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Technologies have specific life cycles, driven by internal innovation, subsequently reaching maturity. Power electronics appears to be a much more complex case as an enabling technology spanning an enormous range of powers, functions and applications. Power electronics is also divided into many constituent technologies. Up to the present, the development of power electronics has been driven chiefly by internal semiconductor technology and converter circuit technology, approaching maturity in its internally set metrics (ex. efficiency). The fundamental functions found in electronic energy processing, the constituent technologies comprising power electronics and the power electronics technology space are examined critically in the light of the internal driving philosophy of power electronics and its historical development. It is finally concluded that, although approaching the limits of its internal metrics indicate internal maturity, the external constituent technologies of packaging, physical impact and converter control technology still present remarkable opportunities for development. As an enabling technology, these developments, together with internal developments such as wide band-gap semiconductors, will be driven externally by applications in future. View full abstract»

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    Advances in power electronics-its impact on the environment

    Bose, B.K.
    Industrial Electronics, 1998. Proceedings. ISIE '98. IEEE International Symposium on

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/ISIE.1998.707743
    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 28 - 30 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Power electronics is one of the fastest changing and evolutionary technologies in electrical engineering in the recent years. This last decade of the 20th Century can be truly defined as the era of power electronics-or more truly, power electronics and information era. The solid-state power electronics revolution (often called the second electronics revolution) started by the invention of the thyristor in the late 1950s, and then continued ceaselessly by invention of many power devices, such as GTOs, triacs, BJTs, power MOSFETs, IGBTs, SITs and MCTs. The advent of new devices and the dramatic improvement of their ratings and characteristics gave a solid foundation for power electronics which resulted in the development of many power converter topologies, analytical and simulation techniques, variable frequency drives, and their control and estimation methods. As a result, the cost of power electronics apparatus fell significantly and their performance improved considerably, which correspondingly, spurred the dramatic surge of power electronics applications everywhere. This contributed to the present era of global industrial automation. Besides the improvement of industrial productivity and product quality, recently another dimension of the importance of power electronics-energy conservation and the corresponding control of environmental pollution-has been realized View full abstract»

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    Power electronics and its applications to renewable energy in Japan

    Arai, J. ; Iba, K. ; Funabashi, T. ; Nakanishi, Y. ; Koyanagi, K. ; Yokoyama, R.
    Circuits and Systems Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 8 , Issue: 3
    DOI: 10.1109/MCAS.2008.928420
    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 52 - 66
    Cited by:  Papers (22)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    The electric utility industry is gradually undergoing restructuring and the main paradigm shift is the introduction of the principles of competition. With the level of future demand for electricity being unclear, power market players are reluctant to commit to long-term capital investment, with the result that construction of new large-scale power plants and also transmission and distribution infrastructure is typically being avoided. At the same time, power facilities are being upgraded in response to business strategies for bringing a profit in power markets and for keeping supply reliability for customers. Under such circumstances of competitive power markets, practical use of renewable and distributed energy generation offers an attractive alternative for power supply. The advantages include a short construction cycle as the supply can be located near to the demand, being less of a burden to the existing transmission network, and contributing to prevention of global warming through clean combustion using novel energy technologies such as natural gas co-generation, natural gas micro turbines, or fuel cells. Distributed generations using renewable energy resources such as wind and solar energy are also attracting attention. Regarding practical use of renewal energy in Japan, a new set of requirements advents. The first is the development of a set of policies for promoting power generated from renewable energy. The second is to evaluate the influence of distributed generations from renewable energy on the quality and reliability of the electricity. The third is the establishment of the technology requirements for interconnection with the power grid. The fourth is the development of future energy supply networks such as Power parks, Microgrids, and Smart grids. In implementing future energy supply networks utilizing renewable energy, power electronic devices are widely used to interface some forms of renewable energy generations and energy storages to distribution n- - etworks, and their use is likely to increase remarkably in the near future. The development of these power electronics is benefiting from the rapid advancements in the capability of power semiconductor switching devices and in the progress being made in the design and control of variable-speed drives for large motors. The most diffused application of power electronic devices is to invert the DC generated from some dispersed energy resources (e.g. photo voltaic fuel cells, micro turbines and battery storages) to existing 50/60 Hz AC. Also, power electronic devices are used to decouple rotating generates from the network and so potentially increase the efficiency of the operation of the prime mover by ensuring that they operate at their most efficient speed for the range of input power. For example, power electronics are used to support variable-speed wind turbines and are also now being proposed for some forms of small hydro-generation and energy storages during transients. In this article, we will discuss the role of power electronics for renewable energy utilizations and the kinds of infrastructure that should be designed and how this should be pursued in order to maintain high reliability and quality for future energy supply networks in the restructured electricity markets. View full abstract»

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    Power electronics, control of the electromechanical energy conversion process and some applications

    van Wyk, J.D. ; Skudelny, H.-Ch. ; Mÿller-Hellmann, A.
    Electric Power Applications, IEE Proceedings B

    Volume: 133 , Issue: 6
    DOI: 10.1049/ip-b:19860052
    Publication Year: 1986 , Page(s): 369 - 399
    Cited by:  Papers (14)

    IET Journals & Magazines

    Some fundamental considerations regarding power electronics and machine electronics are discussed. The historical development of ideas in this field is examined, the applications in the field of electric traction for rail vehicles are summarised and possible future developments are outlined. A systematic approach to power electronics, based upon the control of energy flow in switching convertors, is presented. This approach takes into consideration the different possible switching functions, the modulation functions, the realisation of these switching and modulation functions, the realisation of these switching and modulation functions by practical power semiconductor switches and the different classes of forced turn-off and commutation in power electronic circuits. Subsequently the concepts of topology and structure are defined, leading to different generic topologies for singular convertors. The structure of the five different families of composite convertors are examined, and practical examples are given. The systematic approach to machine electronics presented in the paper is based on a power flow model, using the unifying concept of rotating field theory. In combination with previously defined systematics for power electronics, this enables a systematic approach to the different classes of variable speed drives, based on power flow considerations. The historical developments of some power electronic and machine electronic ideas are traced, starting at the beginning of this century. Since the introduction of power semiconductor switches, applications of the older ideas have increased exponentially in all fields, making it impossible to cover all of them. As a consequence the development of power electronics and control of machines by electronic convertors in the field of electric traction is discussed in some detail, because this represents a record of important engineering achievements in this field. In conclusion, the present state and future trends of power a- nd machine electronics are examined. This evaluation covers the development in the field of switching devices regarding the improvement of interfacing between signal and power electronics, the decrease of switching transition times, the reduction of device losses during conduction, and device developments for decreasing energy storage devices in convertors. The development of power electronic convertors for the reduction of the number of components in the topology and the development of convertors with a high frequency link are then covered, related to the expected development of switching devices. New directions of development regarding the electronic conditioning of the electromechanical energy conversion process concerning the elimination of undesirable effects and losses are important. The implementation of these trends by utilising the improved switching characteristics of power electronic switches and the information processing capability of microprocessors is discussed. This is then extended toward control aspects, where both these characteristics enable solutions not possible hitherto. Field control of AC machines imparts control characteristics equal to, or better than, those obtainable with DC machines to the systems, while the processing capability of microprocessors allows the configuration of adaptive machine electronic systems. Finally attention is given to the interfacing of power electronic and machine electronic systems to the power supply network. If the exponential growth of the installed capacity of equipment in the future is to be handled, active compensation of the distorted currents drawn from the supply by this equipment will have to be considered seriously. View full abstract»

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    Teaching utility applications of power electronics in the first course on power systems

    Mohan, N.
    Power Engineering Society General Meeting, 2003, IEEE

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/PES.2003.1267151
    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 130 - 132 Vol. 1
    Cited by:  Papers (4)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper takes a top-down approach, where first various utility applications of power electronics is briefly described and the role of power electronics as an interface is discussed. The utility applications of power electronics are categorized as follows: distributed generation, power electronic loads, power quality solutions and transmission and distribution (T&D). This presentation also examines the role of power electronics in various applications. Solid-state switches and converters as an interface, which are both roles of power electronics in the power system application, are also discussed. Lastly, the presentation is designed to act as a roadmap to new applications and associated power electronics system. Therefore, a large list of references and Internet resources is included in the presentation. View full abstract»

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    Software-Reconfigurable e-Learning Platform for Power Electronics Courses

    Shun-Chung Wang ; Yi-Hwa Liu
    Industrial Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 55 , Issue: 6
    DOI: 10.1109/TIE.2008.922592
    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): 2416 - 2424
    Cited by:  Papers (28)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    An effective course in power electronics should ideally contain hands-on design and experimental work as well as theory explanation and simulations. In this paper, a software- reconfigurable e-learning platform for power electronics courses is proposed. The aim of the proposed system is to realize a platform capable of constructing a wide range of circuit topologies and control techniques, thus enabling students to gain a better understanding of power electronics converters through practical experiments. The proposed platform consists of a reconfigurable power electronics testbed, a Web-based distance laboratory, and a user interactive e-learning platform. The reconfigurable power electronics testbed can be configured by the students via a Web- based interface to construct a wide variety of converters and inverters. The Internet accessible distance laboratory system permits the instructors and students to remotely conduct experiments over the Internet. The integrated interactive multimedia material can support the educational environment of power electronics courses and can be executed on any modern personal computer (PC) without additional hardware. The advantages of the proposed platform include flexibility, friendly user interface, allow for distance waveform measurements, and removal of laboratory time and space constraints. The positive response from students indicates that the proposed platform is extremely useful for power electronics courses. View full abstract»

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    Quantifying the Value of Power Electronics in Sustainable Electrical Energy Systems

    Popović-Gerber, J. ; Ferreira, J.A. ; Wyk, J.
    Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 26 , Issue: 12
    DOI: 10.1109/TPEL.2011.2166088
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 3534 - 3544
    Cited by:  Papers (5)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    Power electronics enables the efficient generation, use, and distribution of electrical energy because it substantially improves energy conversion efficiency. In order to realize the large electrical energy savings potential enabled by power electronics suitable technological solutions at acceptable cost levels are needed. Moreover, public policy and public acceptance must play an increasingly important role. An effective way to quantify the value of power electronics is needed and it must be presented in such a way that it is understood and appreciated by policymakers. In this paper, energy payback time is shown to be a powerful tool for weighing the value of energy savings achieved by using power electronics versus the energy needed to manufacture the systems. A life cycle analysis of two power electronic converters and their parts is performed. The benefits of energy savings versus energy invested in manufacturing and end-of-life management of power converters is analyzed. It is shown that power electronics systems have considerably shorter energy payback time compared to other technologies. View full abstract»

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    On a Future for Power Electronics

    van Wyk, J.D. ; Lee, F.C.
    Emerging and Selected Topics in Power Electronics, IEEE Journal of

    Volume: 1 , Issue: 2
    DOI: 10.1109/JESTPE.2013.2271499
    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 59 - 72
    Cited by:  Papers (6)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    This paper presents a historical and philosophical perspective on a possible future for power electronics. Technologies have specific life cycles that are driven by internal innovation, subsequently reaching maturity. Power electronics appears to be a much more complex case, functioning as an enabling technology spanning an enormous range of power levels, functions and applications. Power electronics is also divided into many constituent technologies. Till now, the development of power electronics has been driven chiefly by internal semiconductor technology and converter circuit technology, approaching maturity in its internally set metrics, such as efficiency. This paper examines critically the fundamental functions found in electronic energy processing, the constituent technologies comprising power electronics, and the power electronics technology space in light of the internal driving philosophy of power electronics and its historical development. It is finally concluded that, although approaching the limits of its internal metrics indicates internal maturity, the external constituent technologies of packaging, manufacturing, electromagnetic and physical impact, and converter control technology still present remarkable opportunities for development. As power electronics is an enabling technology, its development, together with internal developments, such as wide bandgap semiconductors, will be driven externally by applications in the future. View full abstract»

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    Plug and play power electronics interface applied in microgrid

    Chaoyong Hou ; Xuehao Hu ; Dong Hui
    Electric Utility Deregulation and Restructuring and Power Technologies (DRPT), 2011 4th International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/DRPT.2011.5993986
    Publication Year: 2011 , Page(s): 719 - 723

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Microgrid is predicted to drastically change the whole grid and offer a wide application domain for power electronics. The interface between distributed energy resource (DER) and the grid is usually through power electronics device, which controls the current drawn from the grid and can be driven to optimize the power flow, improve voltage stability and increase distribution efficiency. To achieve the autonomous control of the microgrid, the plug and play(PnP) power electronics interface for DER is a good solution to support device self-identification and system resources assignment. In the paper, the hardware architecture is built by using integrated power electronics module and a novel hierarchical software architecture is proposed by standardizing interfaces between levels. The experimental results indicate the benefits of the PnP power electronics interface. The proposed architecture with high level of flexibility, modularity can benefit the PnP property and paves the way towards future PnP power electronics interface in microgrid. View full abstract»

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    Enabled by high power electronics - Energy efficiency, renewables and smart grids

    Steimer, P.K.
    Power Electronics Conference (IPEC), 2010 International

    DOI: 10.1109/IPEC.2010.5542328
    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 11 - 15
    Cited by:  Papers (14)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The global demand for electrical energy is growing continuously, at double the growth rate of primary energy consumption. A clear transition to more electric energy systems is mandatory as energy efficiency from primary fuel to the enduser and the integration of renewables are the future key challenges. This transition to more electrical energy systems requires the transformation of today's electric power system to a smarter future grid. High power electronics is the key technology to build the next generation of the more electrical energy systems to support the major trends in energy efficiency, renewables integration and smart grid. High power electronics will continue to innovate itself due to the substantial improvement of conventional silicon devices and their packaging technologies reaching higher junction temperature and voltage levels. New wide band-gap material with substantial application benefit will enter niche markets. Multiple new multi-level topologies will change high power electronics fundamentally to support energy efficiency and the direct connection of standard power equipment. Energy efficiency is the most important topic: A real step change in regards of efficient use of primary energy is needed. Energy efficiency requires focus on efficient electrical power generation including mandatory use of waste heat, hybrid and pure electrical transportation and increased industrial process efficiency. We need to create an energy-efficient culture - from primary energy to end user -supported by global regulations. As energy as such will increase in value, efficient use will get attractive. The fast transition to more renewables energy sources is the other important topic. The energy of fifty hours of sunshine hitting the earth is equivalent to the energy stored in coal reserves globally. Therefore the future dominant role of the most important renewables, i.e. solar and wind, is actually unquestionable. The question mark lies on the speed of the transit- - ion. Especially solar power, as simple technology in the application, will develop much faster than expected. Its speed in the last years has always exceeded expectations. The same is valid for wind power since more than a decade. Again this important change needs to be supported by strong global regulations to achieve speed and competitiveness in the market place in this transition phase. And last but not least: To harvest all the investments done in our AC grids, the transition to a smarter grid is mandatory. Such a smart grid will be based on two key ingredients: Intelligence and High power electronics. Intelligence will allow a better utilization of existing assets and will increase the stability margin of the conventional AC grid. High power electronics will mainly add new DC grids and AC Var sources at the transmission and distribution level, serving as backbones and additional stability pillars to existing AC grids. View full abstract»

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    Guidelines for modeling power electronics in electric power engineering applications

    Gole, A.M. ; Keri, A. ; Kwankpa, C. ; Gunther, E.W. ; Dommel, H.W. ; Hassan, I. ; Marti, J.R. ; Martinez, J.A. ; Fehrle, K.G. ; Tang, L. ; McGranaghan, M.F. ; Nayak, O.B. ; Ribeiro, P.F. ; Iravani, R. ; Lasseter, R.
    Power Delivery, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 12 , Issue: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/61.568278
    Publication Year: 1997 , Page(s): 505 - 514
    Cited by:  Papers (35)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    This paper presents a summary of guidelines for modeling power electronics in various power engineering applications. This document is designed for use by power engineers who need to simulate power electronic devices and sub-systems with digital computer programs. The guideline emphasizes the basic issues that are critical for successfully modeling power electronics devices and the interface between power electronics and the utility or industrial system. The modeling considerations addressed in this guideline are generic for all power electronics modeling independent of the computational tool. However, for the purposes of illustration, the simulation examples presented are based on the EMTP or EMTP type of programs. The procedures used to implement power electronics models in these examples are valuable for using other digital simulation tools View full abstract»

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    Power electronics as grid interface for actively controlled wave energy converters

    Molinas, M. ; Skjervheim, O. ; Andreasen, P. ; Undeland, T. ; Hals, J. ; Moan, T. ; Sorby, B.
    Clean Electrical Power, 2007. ICCEP '07. International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/ICCEP.2007.384210
    Publication Year: 2007 , Page(s): 188 - 195
    Cited by:  Papers (14)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Off the coasts of Europe, the potential for power generation from offshore renewable energy is huge and the technology for offshore wind power is already becoming available. Achievement of a cost-effective technology is the main concern for commercial development of wave energy converters (WEC). It is widely recognized that some kind of active control of the primary conversion is needed in order to increase the electricity production and hence improve the economical payback. Moreover, if high penetration levels are going to be reached with offshore renewables, barriers to interconnection will be encountered. These barriers need to be identified and the technologies that will mitigate the impacts on the power system stability need to be investigated. Power electronics will be the enabling interface that will permit wave farms to act as one large power plant. This paper presents known approaches for maximizing production from wave power through active control, and discusses how these can be implemented by power electronics controllers used as interface with the power network. Three alternatives of power electronics interface are presented through three case studies for active control of WEC, power conditioning, and stability. Simulation results indicate the role of the power electronic interfaces in the active control of the wave energy converters and in network interactions. View full abstract»

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    Power electronics control of wind energy in distributed power systems

    Iov, F. ; Ciobotaru, M. ; Blaabjerg, F.
    Optimization of Electrical and Electronic Equipment, 2008. OPTIM 2008. 11th International Conference on

    DOI: 10.1109/OPTIM.2008.4602332
    Publication Year: 2008 , Page(s): XXIX - XLIV
    Cited by:  Papers (4)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The global electrical energy consumption is still rising and there is an urgent demand to increase the power capacity. It is expected that the power capacity has to be doubled within 20 years. The production, distribution and use of energy should be as efficient as possible and incentives to save energy at the end-user should also be set up. Deregulation of energy has in the past lowered the investment in larger power plants, which means the need for new electrical power sources will be high in the near future. Two major technologies will play important roles to solve the future problems. One is to change the electrical power production sources from the conventional, fossil (and short term) based energy sources to renewable energy resources. The other is to use high efficient power electronics in power generation, power transmission/distribution and end-user application. This paper discuss the most emerging renewable energy sources, wind energy, which by means of power electronics are changing from being a minor energy source to be acting as an important power source in the energy system. Power electronics is the enabling technology and the presentation will cover the development in wind turbine technology from kW to MW, discuss which power electronic solutions are most feasible and used today. View full abstract»

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    A future approach to integration in power electronics systems

    van Wyk, J.D. ; Lee, F.C. ; Boroyevich, D. ; Zhenxian Liang ; Yao, K.
    Industrial Electronics Society, 2003. IECON '03. The 29th Annual Conference of the IEEE

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/IECON.2003.1280119
    Publication Year: 2003 , Page(s): 1008 - 1019 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (23)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Assemblies of power semiconductor switches and their associated drive circuit are at present available in modules. Upward into the multi-kilowatt range, mixed mode module construction is used. This incorporates monolithic, hybrid, surface mount and wirebond technology. However, a close examination of the applications in motor drives and power supplies indicates that there has been no dramatic volume reduction of the subsystem. The power semiconductor modules have shrunk the power switching part of the converter, but the bulk of the subsystem volume still comprises the associated control, sensing, electromagnetic power passives (inductors, transformers, capacitors) and interconnects. This paper addresses the improvement of power processing technology through advanced integration of power electronics. The goal of a subsystem in a module necessitates this advanced integration, incorporating active switching stages, EMI-filters and electromagnetic power passives into modules. The central philosophy of the technology development research in the National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center for Power Electronic Systems is to advance the state of the art by providing the concept of integrated power electronics modules (IPEMs) for all these functions. The technology underpinning such an IPEM approach is discussed. The fundamental functions in electronic power processing, the materials, processes and integration approaches and future concepts are explained. View full abstract»

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    Power electronics for sustainable energy future - quantifying the value of power electronics

    Popovic-Gerber, Jelena ; Ferreira, J.A.
    Energy Conversion Congress and Exposition (ECCE), 2010 IEEE

    DOI: 10.1109/ECCE.2010.5618066
    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): 112 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Power electronics is the key technology for the efficient use, distribution and generation of electrical energy. It is estimated that by wider adoption of power electronics about 30% of reduction in electrical energy consumption can be achieved. For many applications technologies are already available but the biggest obstacle to the further market penetration of power electronics are Economy, Policy and Public Acceptance. We need to find better and more effective ways to present the importance and value of power electronics in a way that can be understood by policy makers and that can capture the imagination of the general public. In this paper some possibilities are explored of how we could quantify and explain the added value of using more power electronics. Energy payback time is shown to be a powerful tool to weigh the value of energy savings achieved by using power electronics against the energy needed to manufacture the systems. It is shown that power electronics systems have considerably shorter energy payback time compared to other technologies required for achieving a fully sustainable energy system. View full abstract»

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    Power electronics as efficient interface in dispersed power generation systems

    Blaabjerg, F. ; Zhe Chen ; Kjaer, S.B.
    Power Electronics, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 19 , Issue: 5
    DOI: 10.1109/TPEL.2004.833453
    Publication Year: 2004 , Page(s): 1184 - 1194
    Cited by:  Papers (574)  |  Patents (1)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    The global electrical energy consumption is rising and there is a steady increase of the demand on the power capacity, efficient production, distribution and utilization of energy. The traditional power systems are changing globally, a large number of dispersed generation (DG) units, including both renewable and nonrenewable energy sources such as wind turbines, photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells, small hydro, wave generators, and gas/steam powered combined heat and power stations, are being integrated into power systems at the distribution level. Power electronics, the technology of efficiently processing electric power, play an essential part in the integration of the dispersed generation units for good efficiency and high performance of the power systems. This paper reviews the applications of power electronics in the integration of DG units, in particular, wind power, fuel cells and PV generators. View full abstract»

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    The designs of low power AC-DC converter for power electronics system applications

    Radzuan, R. ; Raop, M.A.A. ; Salleh, M.K.M. ; Hamzah, M.K. ; Zawawi, R.A.
    Computer Applications and Industrial Electronics (ISCAIE), 2012 IEEE Symposium on

    DOI: 10.1109/ISCAIE.2012.6482080
    Publication Year: 2012 , Page(s): 113 - 117

    IEEE Conference Publications

    This paper reviews low power AC-DC converter in different techniques capable of developing high efficiency of energy consumption in many applications. By using low power AC-DC converter, the size of whole system integrated circuit could be reduced. However, the requirements of CMOS converter that required low input voltage and low voltage drop of MOS transistors is discussed. Different techniques in different application are implemented to overcome those problems. In this paper, the reviews of low power AC-DC converters have been focused for energy harvesting systems and wireless power devices only. These AC-DC converters consume several micro-watts from small ac or rf signal voltage and achieve excellent performance in terms of power efficiency. However, the power efficiency of AC-DC converter system is actually highly correlated to the relationship between voltage and the alternating current in ac source. It is because, an in-phase voltage and current in alternating current source is causing in good power factor performance. Power factor correction, PFC is important in many single-phase AC-DC converter circuits to reduce harmonic distortion, hence increase power efficiency of electric appliances. Therefore, the low power AC-DC converter with PFC is proposed. The post-layout of low power AC-DC converter is designed by using the Silterra 0.18 μm technology. The whole post-layout AC-DC converter circuit consumes only 50 μW and works in low voltage, 1V. The power efficiency of whole system also improved to 93%. The proposed low power AC-DC converter with PFC is suitable for future power electronics systems such as battery charger and energy conversion devices. View full abstract»

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    Thermal management of high-power electronics modules packaged with interconnected parallel plates

    Haque, S. ; Kun Xing ; Suchicital, Carlos ; Nelson, D.J. ; Guo-Quan Lu ; Borojevic, D. ; Lee, F.C.
    Semiconductor Thermal Measurement and Management Symposium, 1998. SEMI-THERM Proceedings 1998., Fourteenth Annual IEEE

    DOI: 10.1109/STHERM.1998.660395
    Publication Year: 1998 , Page(s): 111 - 119
    Cited by:  Papers (2)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The Virginia Power Electronics Center at Virginia Tech has developed a low cost approach for packaging of power electronics building blocks (PEBB) consisting of power semiconductor devices, drivers, controls, sensors and protection circuits for a wide range of power electronics applications, such as inverters for motor drives and converters for power processing equipment. The new concept of PEBB packaging, termed metal posts interconnected parallel plate structure (MPIPPS), is based on direct bonding of copper posts to interconnect power devices, thus eliminating wire-bonding with aluminum wires. The interior space between the parallel plates and copper posts can be used as a flow channel for heat dissipation by a dielectric fluid, or filled with a solid or liquid for additional heat spreading. This approach requires less expensive processing equipment and has the potential to produce cost-effective high power modules that have superior electrical, thermal, and mechanical performance. This paper presents the materials selection and fabrication techniques developed in the course of the research and initial electrical and thermal characterization of the MPIPPS structure View full abstract»

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    Automotive power electronics. New challenges for power electronics

    Schoner, H.-P. ; Hille, P.
    Power Electronics Specialists Conference, 2000. PESC 00. 2000 IEEE 31st Annual

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/PESC.2000.878789
    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 6 - 11 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (3)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The need for the realization of innovative functions and new requirements for better serving conventional functions lead to the increased use of electrical power in vehicles. Electrical power is needed for flexible, fast, precise and highly efficient control of actuators for many functions. Remotely controlled power switches for almost any load have been introduced in many cars, implementing protection besides control. Variable speed fans with electronically commutated motors are among the first applications with “high power” (>600 W) motor control. In particular, the need for further reduction in fuel consumption leads to the development of variable speed pumps for fuel supply, lubrication and cooling. Variable motor valves, electrical turbochargers, electrical power steering and active suspension systems are further examples which rely on power electronics. Although there is a general trend to use electrical power in such applications, the cost of power electronics is the critical aspect which dominates the optimal system configuration. First, this leads to the general goal to make power electronics less and less costly to manufacture in large volumes. On the other hand it is necessary to cooperate closely with other disciplines to find the most cost efficient solution in the sense of an integrated mechatronical approach to serve the needs of the market View full abstract»

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    Power electronics in future electrical power grids

    Jing Zhang
    Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems (PEDG), 2013 4th IEEE International Symposium on

    DOI: 10.1109/PEDG.2013.6785586
    Publication Year: 2013 , Page(s): 1 - 3

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Power electronics may substantially improve the controllability and stability of electrical power grids. The high costs for system installation and maintenance as well as the relatively poor reliability of power electronics equipment compared to the traditional equipment make it difficult to be used widely in existing power grids. However, this situation may change if some new proposed designs of electrical power grids become realistic. This paper gives a discussion about power electronics in the future power grids. View full abstract»

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    Power electronics packaging and miniature using chip-scale packaged power devices

    Liu, Xingsheng ; Guo-Quan Lu
    Power Electronics and Motion Control Conference, 2000. Proceedings. IPEMC 2000. The Third International

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/IPEMC.2000.885365
    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 246 - 251 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    The authors present a power electronics packaging technology utilizing chip-scale packaged (CSP) power devices to build three-dimensional integrated power electronics modules (IPEMs). The chip-scale packaging structure, termed Die Dimensional Ball Grid Array (D2BGA), eliminates wire bonds by using stacked solder bumps to interconnect power chips. It has the same lateral dimensions as the starting power chip, which makes high-density packaging and module miniaturisation possible. This package enables the power chip to combine excellent thermal transfer, high current handling capability, improved electrical characteristics, and ultra-low profile packaging. In this paper, the authors introduce the D2BGA power chip-scale package, and present the implementation of these chip-scale packaged power devices in building 30 kW half-bridge power converter modules. The electrical and reliability test results of the packaged devices and the power modules are reported View full abstract»

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    Chip-scale packaging of power devices and its application in integrated power electronics modules

    Liu, Xingsheng ; Xiukuan Jing ; Guo-Quan Lu
    Advanced Packaging, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 24 , Issue: 2
    DOI: 10.1109/6040.928756
    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 206 - 215
    Cited by:  Papers (7)  |  Patents (2)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    A power electronics packaging technology utilizing chip-scale packaged (CSP) power devices to build three-dimensional (3-D) integrated power electronics modules (IPEMs) is presented in this paper. The chip-scale packaging structure, termed die dimensional ball grid array (D2BGA), eliminates wire bonds by using stacked solder joints to interconnect power chips. D2BGA package consists of a power chip, inner solder caps, high-lead solder balls, and molding resin. It has the same lateral dimensions as the starting power chip, which makes high-density packaging and module miniaturization possible. This package enables the power chip to combine excellent thermal transfer, high current handling capability, improved electrical characteristics, and ultralow profile packaging. Electrical tests show that the VCE(sat) and on-resistance of the D2BGA high speed insulated-gate-bipolar transistors (IGBTs) are improved by 20% and 30% respectively by eliminating the device wirebonds and other external interconnections, such as the leadframe. In this paper, we present the design, reliability, and processing issues of D2BGA package, and the implementation of these chip-scale packaged power devices in building 30 kW half-bridge power converter modules. The electrical and reliability test results of the packaged devices and the power modules are reported View full abstract»

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