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    Sir Ambrose Fleming: A Note on the Man Himself

    Cullen, Alex
    Antennas and Propagation Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 51 , Issue: 4
    DOI: 10.1109/MAP.2009.5338749
    Publication Year: 2009 , Page(s): 229 - 230

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    As a schoolboy in the 1930s, working towards my school-leaving examinations in Lincoln, mathematics was not my strong point. My parents, knowing my interest in electrical engineering, and wishing to encourage an interest that seemed to them more likely to lead to a satisfactory career than my other ambition — playing drums in a jazz band - subscribed on my behalf to a periodical on the subject. Published by Newnes, it was eventually bound into four quite large volumes. Of all the many useful things I found in it were several chapters on mathematics, written with the electrical engineer in mind. They were beautifully clearly written, and for the first time I began to understand some very basic bits of mathematics, and to realize why they were important. View full abstract»

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    Sir John Ambrose Fleming His Involvement in the Development of Wireless

    Sarkar, T. ; Mailloux, R. ; Oliner, A. ; Salazar-Palma, M. ; Sengupta, D.
    History of Wireless

    DOI: 10.1002/0471783021.ch10
    Page(s): 311 - 326
    Copyright Year: 2006

    Wiley-IEEE Press eBook Chapters

    This chapter contains sections titled:
    Introduction
    The Early Years
    Research of the University Professor
    Scientific Advisor to the Marconi Company
    The Thermionic Valve
    Later Life
    References View full abstract»

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    The effect of added impurities on the breakdown voltage of insulating oils. (summary of experimental work.)


    Electrical Engineers, Journal of the Institution of

    Volume: 67 , Issue: 390
    DOI: 10.1049/jiee-1.1929.0077
    Publication Year: 1929 , Page(s): 750 - 755

    IET Journals & Magazines

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the effect of impurities on the electric strength of insulating oils, and the results show that while the addition of moisture or cotton or pressboard fibre causes some diminution of the breakdown voltage, the association of moisture with either of the other two greatly increases the effect. After a considerable amount of investigation, test methods, apparatus and technique, to enable the research to be carried out, were developed at University College under the direction of Sir Ambrose Fleming. The investigation thus inaugurated was continued for the Association by the Metropolitan-Vickers Electrical Co., Ltd. The original programme of tests was very exhaustive and included the investigation of many more impurities than were eventually tried; also the number of oils used was reduced to two as it was found that results obtained with many oils were somewhat similar The numerous tables from the various reports have been omitted from this Summary of the Experimental Work, as the curves contained therein (representative of a large number of measurements) show the results of the investigation. Much of the information previously published is of doubtful value, because it ascribes to one class of impurity effects which have most probably been due to the interaction of two or more. View full abstract»

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    Charles K. Kao and other telecommunication pioneers

    Griffiths, H. ; Tong, K. ; Yang, Y.
    Communications Magazine, IEEE

    Volume: 48 , Issue: 3
    DOI: 10.1109/MCOM.2010.5434374
    Publication Year: 2010 , Page(s): S20 - S27

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    On 12 December 1901, the first transatlantic radio communication was made by Guglielmo Marconi from the Poldhu Wireless Station (the transmitter was designed by his scientific advisor, Professor Sir John Ambrose Fleming, also the inventor of the thermionic [or Fleming] Valve in 1904) in Cornwall, United Kingdom, to a temporary receiving station on Signal Hill, St. John¿s, Newfoundland, Canada. Several years later, Guglielmo Marconi and Karl Ferdinand Braun shared the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics 'in recognition of their contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy.' View full abstract»

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