By Topic
Skip to Results

Search Results

You searched for: Early history of vacuum arc deposition
2 Results returned
Skip to Results
  • Save this Search
  • Download Citations Disabled
  • Save To Project
  • Email
  • Print
  • Export Results
  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

    Early history of vacuum arc deposition

    Boxman, R.L.
    Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on

    Volume: 29 , Issue: 5 , Part: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/27.964470
    Publication Year: 2001 , Page(s): 759 - 761
    Cited by:  Papers (7)

    IEEE Journals & Magazines

    Vacuum arc deposition (VAD) was first investigated at the end of the 19th century by A. W. Wright and T. A. Edison, as mirror coatings and seed layers for phonogram replication molds, respectively. The early research anticipated later developments, including cathode shielding, multi-layer coatings, substrate motion, and hybrid processing View full abstract»

  • Full text access may be available. Click article title to sign in or learn about subscription options.

    Vacuum arc deposition: early history and recent developments

    Boxman, R.L.
    Discharges and Electrical Insulation in Vacuum, 2000. Proceedings. ISDEIV. XIXth International Symposium on

    Volume: 1
    DOI: 10.1109/DEIV.2000.877236
    Publication Year: 2000 , Page(s): 1 - 8 vol.1
    Cited by:  Papers (1)

    IEEE Conference Publications

    Vacuum arc deposition (VAD) was first investigated at the end of the 19th Century by A.W. Wright and T.A. Edison as mirror coatings and seed layers for phonogram replication molds, respectively. The early research anticipated later developments, including cathode shielding, multi-layer coatings, substrate motion, and hybrid processing. VAD has become an established industrial art for producing hard, wear-resistant and decorative coatings. Sophisticated coatings, including tertiary compounds and multi-layers, are increasingly used. Filtered vacuum arc deposition and hot electrode vacuum arcs are increasingly investigated to obtain high-quality, macroparticle-free films. Improved filtered sources, including large rectangular filters, have been demonstrated. Besides tool coatings, films for metallizing integrated circuits and protecting magnetic media are being developed View full abstract»

Skip to Results

SEARCH HISTORY

Search History is available using your personal IEEE account.